COLOUR

Using colour effectively in designing will give you the edge - using colour well could make the difference between a good design and a fabulous design. Colour is an element of design and there are many aspects of colour and a lot of confusing terminology which can sometimes make a fascinating subject tedious.

Colour Wheel

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DIMENSIONS OF COLOUR
By
Janthia Holt

The three dimensions of colour are Hue, Value and Chroma. They are the means of describing colour.

Hue refers to: "The specific or family name of a colour which distinguishes one colour segment from another.
A pure hue has full-strength colour." (Pure colour may be found in flowers such as red poppies and yellow daffodils.)

Pure colour may be found in flowers such as red poppies and yellow daffodils.

Value refers to: "The graded scale of lightness or darkness of a colour, measured in relation to a graded scale from black to white. It is the modification of a hue shown in tints, tones and shades by the addition of black, grey and white." (Roses often come in various tints, tones, and shades of the colour red, from pink to maroon.)

Value Range of Red Rose

Chroma refers to: "The intensity of colour. The range extends from extreme dilution to full strength saturation." (In other words some colours appear to contain a lot of the hue/colour such as in the first glass in the photograph, right down to a diluted version of the same colour in the last glass.)

In other words, some colors appear to contain a lot of the hue/colour such as in the first glass in the photograph, right down to a diluted version of the same colour in the last glass.

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INCIDENTAL COLOUR IN COLOUR HARMONY DESIGN
By
Elizabeth Konig

Incidental Colour Definition:
"Subordinate colour that occurs naturally in plant materials; e.g. calyx, centers, stems." Flair

The use of incidental colour in most designing is acceptable, however when a schedule asks for a design to be in a specific colour harmony, or an examination piece is based on a specific colour harmony, the designer would need to consider just how much incidental colour is acceptable.

Care should be exercised when choosing flowers and other plant materials for these designs, and the following are just some considerations that should be observed.

Harmony in Red Ann Kennedy

A feature of grouped Calla stems in a contemporary monochromatic design based on the hue, red,would be down pointed under 'expression and suitability' by the judging panel.

Study in Blue Valmae Cameron

The yellow luminous markings on a blue Iris could also be a distraction if they were used in a monochromatic design based on the hue blue.

Achromatic Harmony Ann Haszard

In an Achromatic design, care should be taken to ensure that green stems do not dominate within the design.

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Gradation of Colour for Traditional Designing
By Linda Barnett

We are always hearing about gradation of colour as a Characteristic for Traditional Designs and yet it is often the characteristic hardest to achieve.

Characteristics of Traditional Designs – “………………………………… A gradual change is size, weight, texture, grouping, colour or form.” Flair

What is gradation of colour?

(As discussed in a previous posting regarding the Dimension of Colour.)

Value is the Dimension of Colour which refers to, “The graded scale of lightness or darkness of a colour, measured in relation to a graded scale from black to white. It is the modification of a hue shown in tints, tones and shades by the addition of black, grey and white.” Flair

Chroma is also a Dimension of Colour which refers to, “The intensity of colour. The range extends from extreme dilution to full strength saturation.” Flair

Tints, tones, and shades and weak and strong chroma of a hue sounds simple but finding the correct plant material to achieve this can be quite difficult and is a must for a good a Traditional Design.

Symmetrical Triangle Muriel
Muriel close up.JPG

In this example the shades and tones are in the Clematis flowers. The daisies and Digitalis are tones and tints. The Erica is a weaker tint; i.e. less chroma. Plant material has been chosen well to achieve good gradation of colour. Gradation of Colour also creates rhythm through the design.

 Crescent Linda Barnett

It can be very hard to use a strong red with its tints tones and shades to create a design with good colour balance. Often with the dark tone of red, the design appears to have a visual hole. As in this example, it is much easier when a less dramatic hue is chosen.

Horizontal line Linda Barnett
 Horizontal line Linda Barnett closeup

Also, depth can be achieved by placing a darker value and stronger chroma flower behind a lighter and less intense one. Thus, as in this example, a flat look has been avoided.

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MORE DISCUSSIONS FROM THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE ON THE COMPLEXITY OF COLOUR

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